November 15-17, 2019, University of Alberta
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Schedule

Here is the full schedule of events for Populism and Its Discontents, Parkland Institute's 2019 Annual Conference. All events take place in ETLC (Engineering Teaching and Learning Complex) on the University of Alberta campus, except the Saturday evening social, which is at Dewey's on campus.

Friday | Saturday | Sunday

Friday

Friday, November 15, 2019 at 07:00 PM
OPENING KEYNOTE

Populism and the Interface

with Mark Kingwell

How does technology affect or facilitate the current rise of right-wing populism? Philosopher, critic, and public intellectual Mark Kingwell will outline some features of the technological and social media landscape that make anti-democratic movements and interventions easier, and more effective. He will also investigate ways of countering these developments.

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Saturday

Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 09:00 AM
MORNING PLENARY

Sacred Politics: When Populism Meets Religion

with Emily Laxer

The global rise of populism is the subject of a growing social scientific literature. From Europe to Latin America, from the United States to parts of Canada, populist movements, parties, and leaders are transforming "politics-as-usual," redefining policy approaches to the economy, migration, the environment, and national identity. In this talk, I consider a defining—yet under-studied—feature of contemporary populism: its relationship to religion. Focusing on the highly-politicized debates over Islamic veiling in France and Québec, I discuss how populist political formations are reshaping popular beliefs around what is sacred, the rule of law, and national belonging. I then consider the implications of this research for theorizing the populism-religion nexus in Canada and beyond.

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 10:30 AM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Truth, the First Casualty? War Rooms and Rumours of War Rooms

with David Climenhaga and Shannon Daub

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 10:30 AM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Racism and the Rise of Right-Wing Populism

with Minister Faust and Irfan Chaudhry

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 01:00 PM
AFTERNOON PLENARY

Until Our Hearts Are On the Ground: Indigenous Women’s Activism, Now and Forever

with Dr. Dawn Lavell-Harvard

After years of working with Indigenous women’s organizations from the grassroots to the national level, Dr. Lavell-Harvard has been involved in all manner of political organizing from community powwows to international protocols in order to advance the rights of Indigenous women and end violence against Indigenous women and girls. This presentation will focus on Indigenous rights and resistance to colonialism (old and new), highlight the ways in which Indigenous people in general, and Indigenous women specifically, are building political movements in this era of right-wing extremism, and explore the evolution of Indigenous political movements in response to authoritarian populism.

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 02:30 PM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Populism and Social Media: The New Instruments of Right-Wing Power

with David Taras and Nora Loreto

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 02:30 PM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Austerity in Alberta: Workers Under the Right

with Alison McIntosh and Jason Foster

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 04:00 PM
AFTERNOON PLENARY

The State of Contemporary Populist Discourse in Canada

with Kelly Gordon

With a string of anti-establishment leaders and parties emerging across the world, most agree that we are living a populist moment. While the particularities of populist forces depend on the national context in which they are mobilized, much of contemporary global populism appeals to a combination of anti-elitist and nativist arguments.

This presentation examines whether this is true in Canada. Drawing on a mixed-method analysis of conservative party and activist politics, I argue that rather than being centered on ethnonational populism, Canadian populist discourse has been shaped by its own unique national debates and colonial legacy. In particular, I examine two increasingly salient sites of conservative populism in Canada: Western regionalist populism and penal populism.

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Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 05:30 PM

Conference 2019 Social

Featuring spoken word artists Dwennimmen and Knowmadic

Join us for conversation and snacks (cash bar) and be inspired by two of Edmonton’s finest spoken word artists.

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Sunday

Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 09:00 AM
MORNING PLENARY

Mobilizations, Moonshots, and Movements: The Promise of the Green New Deal

with Demond Drummer

Climate change continues unabated. The global economy tumbles into recession. Authoritarianism is on the march. Enter the Green New Deal. 

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Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 10:30 AM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Reproductive Rights Under the Right

with Carol Williams, Katelyn Mitchell, and Carly Lara Giles

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Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 10:30 AM
CONCURRENT SESSION

Cutting the Blue Ribbon: Alberta’s Economy in the Spotlight

with Bob Ascah and Richard E. Mueller

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Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 12:00 PM
CLOSING KEYNOTE

Labour Intensive: Putting People Back Into Populism

with Erika Shaker

Widespread public disillusionment resulting from inequality and austerity being inadequately addressed by governments has created a fertile recruiting ground for right-wing populist politicians and movements. It's no secret that the right has largely benefited from this surge. But there remains tremendous room for progressives to harness the potential of established community networks—including labour—and social programs in order to organize around a collective, collaborative, future-looking and justice-based vision. While labour intensive, it benefits from what we already have in our favour—the sheer number of people whose families depend on what we have already successfully organized for. And it’s rooted in the recognition that we deserve and can do better, especially for future generations.

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